Politics

The media are incorrect: Trump has repeatedly rejected white supremacy

The mainstream media has pounced on a dubious narrative that President Trump did not denounce white supremacy in this week's presidential debate.

They have focused on his message to the Proud Boys, in which Trump said "stand by and stand by".

CNN correspondent Sara Sidner reported that the far-right group "is more like a political fighting club, if you will, than a white supremacist group and has distanced itself".

Even so, the "ready" comment is used to claim that the president gave the white supremacists a wink and a nod.

However, the minutes of the debate itself show Trump's willingness to oppose any group responsible for street violence.

"Are you ready tonight to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and say they need to resign and not increase violence in a number of these cities such as we saw in Kenosha and Portland?" Moderator Chris Wallace asked.

"Sure. Sure I'm ready for that," Trump replied.

Wallace continued to express the subject, to which the President replied, "I am ready to do anything. I want to see peace."

A third attempt by Wallace to lure Trump led to a specific call to the Proud Boys to "step back and stand by".

The liars in the media cut Trump's answer out of their minutes.

"Sure. Of course I'm ready for it."

They're doing the Fine People Hoax again https://t.co/ZBZ9J9uulv

– Jack Posobiec @ (@JackPosobiec) September 30, 2020

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RELATED: Trump Slams Chris Wallace: "I Think I'm Discussing You, Not Him."

Trump has repeatedly denounced white supremacy

The controversy surrounding the debate has again shades of the Charlottesville joke.

Someone – in this case, Wallace – is telling Trump to repeatedly denounce white supremacy, and if he gives multiple answers, he'll focus on who is driving their narrative.

Wallace brought up Charlottesville during the debate and almost repeated it as a fact when he asked Biden if he wanted to run for president (focus mine).

"Vice President Biden, you say that President Trump's reaction to the violence in Charlottesville three years ago, when he spoke about very good people on both sides, was what prompted you to start this presidential campaign," he said.

But the media-driven Charlottesville joke is actually a shining example of how the president actually denounces white supremacists.

Within seconds of the "fine people" commenting on the peaceful protesters in Charlottesville in 2017, the president explicitly called out the bigots at the rally.

"I'm not talking about the neo-Nazis and white nationalists," said Trump, "because they should be totally condemned."

Here is Trump's video which says, "I'm not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists because they should be totally condemned."

Joe Biden denies this happened pic.twitter.com/AejOrmskoe

– Ryan Saavedra (@RealSaavedra) August 8, 2019

RELATED: The Top 5 Trump Moments From Last Night's Presidential Debate

Trump's story of denouncing white supremacy

The Washington Post published a chronology of the president's comments on white supremacist David Duke.

In 1991, Trump responded to news that 55 percent of whites in Louisiana had voted for Duke as their governor, saying, "I hate to see what it represents."

When Trump turned down a nomination for President of the Reform Party in 2000, Trump stated, "Well, you've just joined David Duke – a fanatic, a racist, a problem. I mean, these are not exactly the people you are in your group want to have. "

And in 2015, when Duke gave Trump a backhand endorsement, the president replied, "I don't need his endorsement. I certainly wouldn't want his support."

Duke was quite outraged by Trump over his comments in Charlottesville, particularly because they denounced him and his white supremacists.

Like this? pic.twitter.com/At6nLcwDEl https://t.co/zvWfhPjpQx

– MAGS (@ TAftermath2020) September 30, 2020

Factcheck.org reports that Biden's claim that Trump "condemned white supremacy, the neo-Nazis," is false.

"Contrary to Biden's assertion," they write, "the president has twice condemned white supremacists and neo-Nazis and has since repeated that condemnation."

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany was asked again today by Fox News reporter John Roberts whether the President condemns white supremacists.

Kayleigh @PressSec ends media attempt to proceed with fake White Supremacy narrative. @FoxNews @realDonaldTrump pic.twitter.com/h9qj0xjowE

– "Maggie VandenBerghe" (@FogCityMidge) October 1, 2020

Roberts got hammered for asking a question that had already been answered multiple times.

He went to Fox News to complain about the backlash.

"Stop distracting. Stop blaming the media, ”he replied angrily. "I'm tired of it."

Impressive! Fox & # 39; @johnrobertsFox hits back on Twitter users after some criticized them for asking @PressSec to denounce white supremacy: "I don't care to anyone on Twitter who pound me for the question. Listen Stop distracting. Stop blaming the media. I'm tired of it. " pic.twitter.com/RyMwc4SuaQ

– TV News HQ (@TVNewsHQ) October 1, 2020

Fox News contributor Bill Bennett hit back on Roberts.

"I'm sorry he's angry, but he's just wrong," he said. "Play the tape again – Kayleigh said," We denounce white supremacy in all its forms. What more do you want from us? "

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